Important Facts About Caracal Pet You Need To Know

All around the world people have different types of pets from a simple dog or cat to exotic ones like snakes and reptiles. Some have even adopted wild animals to become pets. One of these wild animals includes the caracal cat.

The name caracal comes from the Turkish word ‘karakalak’ which means ‘a black ear.’ It is a medium-sized animal native to the deserts and savannahs of Africa, Central Asia, the Arabian Peninsula and the Caspian Sea coast.

The caracal is a carnivore which normally hunts small mammals. Its average lifespan when in captivity is 16 years.

Historically caracals had importance in many cultures around the world. In Egypt paintings of caracals and bronze sculptures have been found and also embalmed carcasses as well.

This means that they were of great importance to the Egyptians. In China, emperors gave caracals as gifts. In India, caracals were used by rulers to hunt small game and also their coats were used to in making fur coats.

This also shows that domestication of caracals is not something new but rather started centuries ago.

When you decide to adopt a caracal cat as a pet there a few things you should consider.

These include how to choose the right kitten, how to care for the animal, what behavior to expect, reproduction and also the threats against the animal.

1. Choosing a Caracal Kitten

cutes caracal pet
photogrist.com

Caracal pet kittens can either be raised in open-air cages or domestic nurseries. It is advised that you choose a kitten from the latter. Kittens from open-air cages maybe too wild and dangerous to keep as pets.

To be tamed a caracal kitten should be in constant human contact from a very young age. At the age of 6 months, the kittens can be confidently adopted.

Fortunately, caracal pets adapt quickly and easily to new environments so the change should be easy. Caracal pets are friendly animals and should bond well with children and other pets.

2. How to Handling and Care Caracal Pet?

caracal kitten
AmanziTravel.com

When caring for a caracal pet there a few things you should consider. Like their food, exercise, and health.

As stated earlier caracals are carnivores that hunt mostly small animals, so basically they should be fed mostly raw meat. They can also be fed with high-quality dry cat food.

Related: Facts About American Bobtail Cats

A caracal pet should be fed one to two times a day at the same time so as to create a routine. The amount of food depends on the season and the size of the animal.

An adult caracal should consume approximately an average of 4% of its body weight. The caracal pet may eat more during a growth period.

When it comes to seasons, the caracal pets may eat less during the summer when it’s hot and more during the winter when it’s cold. Leftover food should be collected and kept away.

Also, it is not unusual for it to go a day without eating, this may happen on different occasions.

When it comes to exercise a caracal pet should walk on a leash. It is also recommended that it stays in an open-air cage with the small minimum size of 15 square meters and a height of 2.5m.

The height is necessary because caracals are jumpers and will jump short fences. They like to play with toys like a ball and run around like other pets.

Health wise a sick caracal should under regular observation. Also, take it to a vet like any other pet.

3. Behaviour of Caracal Cat

kitten
Amazing Caracal Pet

Caracals in nature are solitary animals. When domesticated are playful animals and are friendly around both people and other animals. They undergo training so on going to the toilet in a litter box like other cats.

They also play around with toys, but it is important to choose the right toys and not ones that can be harmful to the animal. Caracal pets are curious creatures and will find a toy if you hide it from them.

Wild caracals can be dangerous and unpredictable. They can be harmful to your children and other animals. So as stated earlier, always ensure that you adopt one from a nursery, one that has gone through taming.

4. Reproduction and Offspring

Caracal Cat
HonestToPaws.com

Caracals become mature after one year. In the successful wild mating can take up to 15 months and breeding will take place throughout the year.

They have a gestation period of about 78 to 81 days and can produce a litter of up to 4 kittens. They are born with eyes shut and claws not retractable.

Related: Facts About Donskoy Cat

The kittens completely open their eyes 6 to 10 days after they are born. Their weaning is at 10 weeks and may remain with the mother for up to a year.

5. Threats Caracal Pet

caracal animal profile
NationalGeographicKids.com

In some countries, the caracal is killed for livestock predation while in others they are killed for their skin and meat.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources has categorized the animal as Least Concern.

This categorization has not stopped some countries from prohibiting the hunting of these animals. Despite this, caracals should not be killed but protected as all living things should.

In conclusion, it is safe to say that a caracal can be domesticated and kept as a pet. The care it requires is not much different as compared to other pets.

Like all pets, they need your time and attention. So if you want to get on as a pet follow the above recommendations and everything will be great.

Caracal Cat Images

34 thoughts on “Important Facts About Caracal Pet You Need To Know”

    • Wild cats do not make good pets. That is a myth breeders claim. Why would you want to cage a beautiful creature that was created to be free?

      Reply
      • Well, if you have the room for it like lots of fenced in land and a large house where the animal would be happy and if you could give it lots of time and know how to properly take care of one and can ensure that the animal would be happy then there shouldn’t be a problem with it. As long as the animal is happy and feels loved then it’s okay to own them as a pet in my eyes. I agree that caging a wild animal is completely wrong but if you actually have the room for it and the time to dedicate to the animal then I say go for it!

        Reply
          • It will be very expensive when someone uses you because you caravel killed their cat, or dog, or small child or when it attacks and injures someone. These are wild animals and not Tamable

        • ABSOLUTELY..!!! I DONT BELIEVE IN KEEPING WILD ANIMALS TAMMED EAITHER…
          AS IT SAYS.. IF YOU HAVE THE TIME..LOVE….AND PROPER CARE FOR OPENED FENCED IN AIR.. AND KNIW HOW TO CARE FOR THE ANIMAL..
          AND IF THEIR HAPPY…HEALTHY…N…LOVED I DONT SEE THE PROBLEM

          Reply
      • I breed and raise domestic caracal babies legally in Florida. I am Fish and Wildlife and USDA licensed For the “right” home caracals make wonderful pets. They do need a spacious outdoor enclosure to exercise and many States require permits or prohibit keeping them altogether.
        A domestic caracal, raised in home under foot is trusting of humans and as sweet and tame as a cat or almost more like a dog in nature and temperament. I find caracals to be loyal, closely bonded to their owners and very self confident and laid back. In my opinion caracals make much better pets than servals, which I also raise. I currently own 8 caracals. Every one of them is friendly.

        Reply
        • I have 40 Acres of land in the Pacific northwest. Wa. Can’t figure out the laws here. to many exstream activist muddy the waters on line. I am retired live alone and love cats. i have only had domestic cats my whole life. Im a handy builder and plan a big enclosure inside and out for these Cats. i would love to talk to you about these, Caracals .How do i contact you.

          Reply
  1. I agree with Kelsey, if the Caracel kittens can be taken care of well, with plenty of room, love and attention, as well as companionship; then there should not be a problem. They are beautiful animals, and should be treasured as all animals deserve. Living in the wild has it’s own drawbacks as everyone knows, but as all pet owners should know, our pets have responibilities that can’t be ignored, and when they are, it’s deplorable, Financial investment seems to be a good equalizer as far as those who can take good care of these types of special animals. They are very beautiful, but if you can’t invest in the needs of this sweet animals, leave it alone.

    Reply
    • “Zoologist” has obviously never shared a home with caracals, to make this statement . Caracals, if raised under foot in a domestic, loving home get along fine with other pets and children, just like any other cat. making blanket statements like this is equal to: ” All pitbulls are dangerous”.
      Unless you have actual experience with domestically raised caracals, don’t presume to know, because you OBVIOUSLY DO NOT.
      If you are interested to learn more about domestically raised caracals, please contact me : [email protected]

      Reply
  2. This article is completely false. Caracals are wild cats and are NOT tameable as pets. They will most likely destroy all of your furniture, eat any smaller pets you may have like cats or dogs, and possibly even attack your small children. They require A LOT of exercise on a daily basis and will act out in negative ways if you don’t provide them with constant exercise. Whoever wrote this article is probably a breeder trying to profit by selling you a false image glamorizing these animals in a domestic setting when really they are selling you a huge problem and liability which will certainly place you and the animal in a bad situation. Be Aware !

    Reply
    • “Zoologist” has obviously never shared a home with caracals, to make this statement . Caracals, if raised under foot in a domestic, loving home get along fine with other pets and children, just like any other cat. making blanket statements like this is equal to: ” All pitbulls are dangerous”.
      Unless you have actual experience with domestically raised caracals, don’t presume to know, because you OBVIOUSLY DO NOT.
      If you are interested to learn more about domestically raised caracals, please contact me : [email protected]

      Reply
  3. This article is NOT false. I have had one for 4 years and she is one of the sweet, playful and lovable animals that have ever been a part of my family. Just like there are feral domestic cats that are wild in the world there are domesticated caracals. They are no bigger or any more less domesticated than an F1 Savanah or other hybrid. If you don’t think it’s no to have a domesticated Caracal but it’s absolutely fine to have a domesticated Savanah or even just the average house cat youre nothing more than a hypocrite. “Domestic” house cats can live in their own the same as any other “wild” cats and survive and thrive just fine but you have no problem making them pets. Get over yourselves. Caracals are not lions or leopards.

    Reply
  4. I don’t know what some of you mean. I own a Caracal and have it at home as a “pet”, but she also has a large enclosure in my garden. Furthermore, she loves going running with me (on a leash) and loves interacting with ppl. Having said that, I did own her since she was kitten (2 months old) and I ensured that she was used to ppl and other animals. She still loves catching birds though. All in all she is lovely, but large. She is a very pleasant house companion – as long as you do have a large house and garden and interact with your caracal daily. Wouldn’t recommend getting an adult caracal which has been housed in a cage, because they will most likely not be happy in your home and wreck it.

    Reply
    • I do not know the laws in Indiana but you have to check w/county laws and city planning and zoning where you live to be safe. personally,i would probably be a bit hesitant to even purchase one from anyone who breeds that doesn’t outright ask you if you know all the info.etc.that could in anyway put the kitten in harms way,a reputable breeder will NOT allow their babies to go anywhere that could be a potential threat. after I looked all my info up in my state I believe I called our dept.of natural resources and spoke to an officer there and I also hired an attny just to go over the law as its written to ensure I was interpreting it correctly. its surprising at times just how complicated and “grey” our laws etc.are to understand. the person I got my first caracal from was very knowledgeable on the laws and things. BTW-feline conservation federation supplies members w/details on various husbandry education and where for anyone who wants to get as much knowledge as you can on caring for bigger kitties-no,they aren’t an average domesticated house cat but ive went around w/feral kittens and boy im here to tell you first hand that in the wrong hands-almost anything can be a danger,i love caracals,they are such an amazing cat and so very beautiful w/much intelligence to match!! I would consider them more comparable to a dog than a cat in respect to communication etc.they are highly highly food aggressive so if your caracal refuses food theres likely a problem and being true to form,generally if theres a change in appetite we cannot know just how minimal or serious an issue could be as they naturally have an instinct to hide signs of problems so do not hesitate to get help first and be glad you at least made sure nothing could be wrong because by the time they quit eating it could be or become a big deal w/little more notice…better safe than sorry!ive found that through a lot of trial and error and research they can make an amazing edition to any family depending on how much you are willing to put into being a good owner…god put these creatures here for us to love I believe that firmly so if you do not agree with ppl having caracals then don’t get one-simple as that-what others do in their homes within their rights really isn’t anyones business as far as im concerned!! educate yourself!! that’s the single most important thing you can do for your caracal!

      Reply
    • Indiana
      Category: L

      Division of Fish and Wildlife

      402 W Washington St., Rm. W273 Indianapolis, IN 46204 317-232-4080

      State Web Site

      Department of Natural Resources Web Site

      Department of Wildlife Web Site

      Issues Wild Animal Possession Permits. Permits are for one year only, must be renewed annually. Class III is for wild cats. Bobcats are native endangered species, but may be legally possessed with proof of legal captive birth paperwork. Must provide health certificate for animal being possessed, escape recapture plan, pay $10.00 fee, have cages inspected by conservation officer. Provides caging requirements that include: concrete floors must be covered with natural substrate, loafing platforms, 14 foot tall walls with 45 degree incline can be used if no roof provided, etc. Persons licensed by the USDA as commercial exhibitors, zoos or dealers are exempted from this state permit and its requirements.

      Please contact me , should you need more answers: [email protected]

      Reply
  5. Just a friendly warning to all those caracal cat lovers.
    Our caracal, which we bought from a nursery when she was 2 months old destroyed our life.
    On one sunny day she attacked our lovely daughter when she was 3 years old..She is now 7 years old and had to undergo several facial surgeries.Her face is still completely deformed.Her nose was bitten off as well as pieces of her lips.This attack also left her without an ear and several other scars in her face.
    The vet had no other option to put her out.According to him the caracal had a desease and in pain which was the obvious reason for the attack.
    The cat had 8 acres of fenced freedom.
    My advice is never, ever to use a wild animal as a pet.Especcially if you have kids.
    Caracals sell for a fortune.Google UTube, “Super expensive caracal cat stolen from breeders flat”
    Very interesting.But be warned.

    Reply
    • Andre, if you had a caracal (or any other pet) and you let that animal outside, even in a high-fenced enclosure, without being vaccinated, you are totally irresponsible, The disease you are describing sounds like rabies. All cats should be vaccinated against rabies, and ANY rabid animal will attack like a mindless zombie when they reach that stage of the disease. It is YOUR fault your daughter was attacked, because you are too foolish to own ANY pet, even a hamster.

      The only thing I have against people owning exotic pets (or ANY pet, for that matter) is that too many of these people are not responsible enough to properly care for the animal. If the animals are properly socialized and the people are well-heeled enough and responsible enough, there should be no real issues. If the people are crack-addicts from the night shift at Wal-Mart, they can’t even care for themselves, much less a child or furry critter.

      Reply
      • I too question the validity of Andre’s story, but I feel as though you don’t know much about rabies. Unless their child was taken to the doctor immediately, doctors discovered the rabies relatively fast and then treated her for it, their daughter would be dead. Rabies often goes unnoticed because there are no symptoms for the majority of time after it’s contracted, and once symptoms are present it is 100% incurable and fatal. So, if Andre’s story happens to be real, then the only possible way it would have been rabies would be if the scenario I described occurred.

        Also, Andre, any proof for this story? That’s quite a claim on a thread of people looking for real information. That’s a really traumatic story, I’m sure you’ve told it in other places?

        Reply
  6. You may absolutely visit your know-how within the artwork you’re posting.. cat This market desires of more enthusiastic internet writers just like you who seem to aren’t fearful to state the direction they consider. At all times comply with ones soul.

    Reply
  7. I call bullshit on andre do you evenknow how big an acre is. It is 43,560sq ft so your eight acre pen is 348,480 sq ft or 208 ft per side per acre 1,664 ft by 1,664 ft i dont buy your story sorry so what is that a clear span pen what kinda roof you got on that pen

    Reply
    • I grew up in Cape Town, South Africa and, inadvertently, had a Caracal as a pet that I hand reared when her mother was killed by Hyenas and I found her, as a very young kitten, by the road. We had a large home and compound with very high walls. I mention that as Caracals can and do leap as high as 12 feet in the air to catch their food-a useful attribute in a household pet. I was an adult and absolutely would not recommend having one of these charming animals around the young or a household with other pets. While she completely imprinted on all who lived in and around us, she was suspicious of strangers, necessary to keep her on a leash-very difficult to do.

      Many people in Africa have and had ‘exotic’ pets to varying degrees of success and failure. A Caracal is at base a wild animal that will accept humans easily but one must never lose sight of the fact that as affectionate as they can be, there are problems that can and will arise as with any ‘exotic’ or wild animal kept as a pet. In the end I had to send her to a place in the Caprivi Strip where they could provide large spaces for this sort of animal. I was very sorry to let her go but….it was really the only choice. As was pointed out to me, if I had not found her, her life span could probably been a few hours. That sounds heartless but when you live around wild animals at all times, you learn to accept that sympathy and empathy cannot and do not make a wild animal into a satisfactory pet.

      Reply
  8. I live in Florida and I raise caracals and servals. I am USDA and FWC licensed. I also hold a CITES II import and export license. Caracals and servals can make good pets for a select group of people, able to house, feed and care for these animals correctly. They are n o t domesticated animals, they do have a strong prey drive and they need to be contained in a roofed enclosure. Should they get out they will not return as they lack homing instinct. Caracals and servals can be very tame if bottle raised and well socialized early in life, almost like a house cat. They also can use a (large) litter box. I would not recommend them around small children or animals. Even “rough play” can inadvertently leave a child or smaller animal with a nasty scratch. Just use common sense. They are not a pet for “everyone” but an unforgettable pet for some.neither species is endangered and classified of “least concern.” Unfortunately caracals are often shot by African farmers for fear of killing life stock, though rather unjustly since the main diet consists of rodents and birds.

    Reply
  9. We all know wild animals can most likely not be tamed. Lions, Leopards, Cougars and the like, for example. The Caracal, feral cats, and other species have a remarkable propensity to adjust to living with humans and turning out to be pretty wonderful pets. If bottle fed through their second and third week, they can transition very well. Like all pet owners you must be knowledgeable of the animal BEFORE you purchase it and exactly how to take care of it and provide its needs. Just like you were bringing home a German Shepherd you wouldent want to bring it into a house of excitable, small children that run wild and insist the Caracal needs a big hug and nearly strangled the cat. Some with animals. It you have a ping pong, drag racing cat or dog that barks incessantly at the Caracal, you’ll have problems. The best atmosphere would be calm, quiet, loving and caring for such a beautiful animal. Remember those teeth and claws are sharp and can be very dangerous to children, other pets and adults. Be aware, be attentive, be loving, and caring and you will have success. Good luck!

    Reply
  10. Indiana
    Category: L

    Division of Fish and Wildlife

    402 W Washington St., Rm. W273 Indianapolis, IN 46204 317-232-4080

    State Web Site

    Department of Natural Resources Web Site

    Department of Wildlife Web Site

    Issues Wild Animal Possession Permits. Permits are for one year only, must be renewed annually. Class III is for wild cats. Bobcats are native endangered species, but may be legally possessed with proof of legal captive birth paperwork. Must provide health certificate for animal being possessed, escape recapture plan, pay $10.00 fee, have cages inspected by conservation officer. Provides caging requirements that include: concrete floors must be covered with natural substrate, loafing platforms, 14 foot tall walls with 45 degree incline can be used if no roof provided, etc. Persons licensed by the USDA as commercial exhibitors, zoos or dealers are exempted from this state permit and its requirements.

    Please contact me , should you need more answers: [email protected]

    Reply
  11. I agree, Chad!
    I currently live with 8 caracals, 6 adults and two babies. All of them are sweet and tame. None is dangerous. They do have certain requirements for space and keeping ( enclosures and restrictions.) in the “right” environment though they make awesome pets!
    Domestically bred and reared caracals are very rare in the US and are cost prohibitive for most families. They need to eat meat and not every vet clinic is equipped to treat wildlife. Caracals can live 20 years. Needless to say , much care and consideration needs to be taken, before committing to these kind of animals.
    If you have more questions, please feel free to contact me: [email protected]

    Reply
  12. Middag
    Ons het wilde luiperde in d veld wat snags skape vang.
    Daar is n paar mense wat probeer hokke stel en vang.
    Maar niemand kry hul gevang nie.
    En dan laat hulle d luiperde op ander plekke los en dan kom hul weer.
    Hoe kan n mens hul opspoor en vang en in bewarings area plaas en nie ons diere opvreet nie.
    Die plaas is in moutonshoek , sandveld naby piketberg.
    Iets anders, kan ons nie baba Rooikat groot maak en dit saam met ons skape wei dat as die luiperd kom dat dit bang sal wees vir die rooikat nie.
    Ons is baie lief vir diere en weet hoe om hul groot te maak.

    Hoor graag van u
    Mendelt v wijk
    0829610687

    Reply

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